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Bacterial and viral airborne infections: influenza, parainfluenza, adenovirus infection, respiratory syncytial infection. Bacterial bronchopneumonia, lobar pneumonia.



1. Supplement: Atelectasis of the lungs is _______________________.

2. The clinical and morphological form of bacterial pneumonia is determined

1. type of inflammation 3. etiological agent

2. lesion territory 4. response of the body

3. With croupous pneumonia, the consistency of the affected lobe

1. tight

2. flabby

3. not changed

4. The ability of a virus to selectively infect cells and tissues is called:

1. virulence 4. phagocytosis

2. pathogenicity 5. tropism

3. invasiveness

5. Causes of death in the toxic form of severe influenza

1. thromboembolism

2. lobar pneumonia

3. toxic pulmonary edema

4. acute renal failure

5. acute heart failure

6. hemorrhages in vital organs

6. The airways of the lungs include:

1. acinus 4. trachea

2. terminal bronchiole 5. bronchi

3. alveolar duct 6. pneumocytes

7. Forms of bacterial pneumonia

1. lobar 4. staphylococcal

2. viral 5. bronchopneumonia

3. pneumococcal

8. In the stage of gray hepatization of croupous pneumonia, the exudate consists of

1. edematous fluid and bacteria 3. white blood cells and fibrin

2. red blood cells and fibrin 4. granulation tissue

9. The influenza virus has a tropism for

1. neurons 4. alveolar epithelium

2. hepatocytes 5. vascular endothelium

3. cardiomyocytes 6. epithelium of bronchioles

10. Severe influenza with pulmonary complications due to

1. accession of a secondary infection

2. the development of croupous pneumonia

3. cerebral hemorrhage

4. the development of focal pneumonia

11. The respiratory part of the lungs include:

1. acinus 4. trachea

2. terminal bronchiole 5. bronchi

3. alveolar duct 6. pneumocytes

12. The basis for the development of focal pneumonia is

1. atelectasis 3. acute emphysema

2. acute bronchitis 4. acute pneumonitis

13. In the stage of red hepatization of croupous pneumonia, the exudate consists of

1. white blood cells and fibrin 3. red blood cells and fibrin

2. granulation tissue 4. edematous fluid and white blood cells

14. The cytopathic effect of influenza virus is microscopically manifested.

1. inflammation 4. necrosis of the epithelium of bronchioles and alveoli

2. tissue edema 5. dystrophy of the epithelium of bronchioles and alveoli

3. hemorrhages

15. In severe influenza with pulmonary complications develops

1. purulent endobronchitis 3. metaplasia of the bronchial epithelium

2. purulent mesobronchitis 4. purulent destructive panbronchitis

16. Resorption atelectasis occurs when:

1. foreign body aspiration

2. exudative pleurisy

3. deficiency in the synthesis of surfactant

4. interstitial fibrosis

5. chronic bronchitis

17. The most important complications of bronchopneumonia

1. abscess 4. carnification

2. pleurisy 5. pneumosclerosis

3. emphysema 6. chronic bronchitis

18. In the inflow stage of croupous pneumonia, the exudate consists of

1. white blood cells and fibrin 3. red blood cells and fibrin

2. granulation tissue 4. edematous fluid and bacteria

19. Joining a secondary infection with influenza is associated with the action of the virus

1. immunosuppressive 3. cytopathic

2. neuropathic 4. vasopathic

20. Metaphorically mild in severe influenza with pulmonary complications is called

1. "greasy" 3. "shock" 5. "big red"

2. "cellular" 4. "big white" 6. "big motley"

21. Compression atelectasis occurs when:

1. foreign body aspiration 4. interstitial fibrosis

2. exudative pleurisy 5. chronic bronchitis

3. deficiency in the synthesis of surfactant

22. Depending on the volume of the lesion with bronchopneumonia, foci are distinguished

1. acinous 4. polysegmental

2. shared 5. total

3. segmental

23. To establish compliance:

VOLUME OF THE POINT OF DAMAGE OF A PNEUMONIA

1. share a) focal

2. acinus b) croupous

3. lobule

4. segment

5. multiple segments

24. The immunosuppressive effect of the virus is manifested

1. hemorrhages

2. autoimmunization

3. activation of neutrophil phagocytosis

4. suppression of phagocytosis of neutrophils

5. suppression of macrophage chemotaxis

25. The characteristic appearance of the lung in severe influenza with pulmonary complications is due to

1. inflammation 4. abscess formation

2. pneumosclerosis 5. foci of emphysema

3. hemorrhages 6. foci of atelectasis

26. Spotted atelectasis occurs when:

1. foreign body aspiration

2. exudative pleurisy

3. deficiency in the synthesis of surfactant

4. interstitial fibrosis

5. chronic bronchitis

27. A synonym for focal pneumonia

1. croupous 3. bronchopneumonia

2. pleuropneumonia 4. interstitial

28. Clinical sign - pleural friction noise - characteristic of pneumonia

1. focal

2. croupous

3. interstitial

29. To establish compliance:

MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTER AT INFLUENZA CHARACTER OF CHANGES

1. interstitial inflammation a) general

2. discirculatory disorders b) local

3. necrosis of the epithelium of the bronchi and alveoli

4. dystrophy of the parenchymal organs

5. dystrophy of the epithelium of the bronchi and alveoli

30. Brain changes in severe influenza presented

1. serous meningitis 4. hydrocephalus

2. neuronal degeneration 5. calcification

3. hemorrhages

31. Contraction atelectasis occurs when:

1. foreign body aspiration

2. exudative pleurisy

3. deficiency in the synthesis of surfactant

4. interstitial fibrosis

5. chronic bronchitis

32. Set the correct sequence:

STAGES OF LARGE PNEUMONIA

1. red guardianship

2. gray ward

3. permissions

4. tide

33. For croupous pneumonia, the staging process

1. characteristic

2. not characteristic

34. General changes in the flu

1. dystrophy and necrosis of the epithelium of the bronchi and alveoli

2. dystrophy of the parenchymal organs

3. discirculatory disorders

4. interstitial inflammation

5. systemic vasculitis

35. In the toxic variant of severe influenza, changes are more pronounced

1. general

2. local

36. Supplement: The pathomorphogenesis of RDSV is associated with ____________________________.

37. To establish compliance:

STAGE OF LARGE PNEUMONIA DURATION

1. tide a) 1st day

2. red guardianship b) 2 - 3 days

3. gray guardianship c) 5 - 7 days

4. Permissions d) 7-14 days

d) 25 days

f) 40 days

38. Atelectasis of the lung - a change in lung tissue - in the form

1. increase airiness

2. inflammation

3. collapse

4. necrosis

39. Forms of influenza according to the nature of the course

1. mild 4. moderate

2. severe 5. relapsing

3. abortive

40. Extrapulmonary complications of severe influenza

1. chronic sinusitis 3. arachnoiditis

2. pneumofibrosis 4. encephalitis

41. Supplement: Nosocomial pneumonia is _________________________.

42. To establish compliance:

STAGE OF LARGE PNEUMONIA COMPOSITION OF EXUDATE

1. tide a) edematous fluid and bacteria

2. red hepatization b) eosinophils and neutrophils

3. gray hepatitis c) macrophages and plasmocytes

g) red blood cells and fibrin

d) white blood cells and fibrin

43. Adult distress syndrome is associated with:

1. pulmonary edema

2. surfactant deficiency

3. diffuse damage to the capillaries of the alveolar septum

44. With a mild form of influenza, inflammation develops in the mucous membrane of the upper respiratory tract

1. purulent

2. catarrhal

3. fibrinous

4. hemorrhagic

5. serous - hemorrhagic

45. Supplement: A distinctive feature of respiratory syncytial infection is the defeat of ________________________.

46. ​​Supplement: Bronchopneumonia is __________________________________.

47. Supplement: Lobar pneumonia often causes ___________________________.

48. With croupous pneumonia, pleura develops on the pleura

1. serous

2. croupous

3. diphtheria

49. With a mild form of influenza in the mucous membrane of the upper respiratory tract, you can identify

1. anemia

2.
gland hypersecretion

3. vascular congestion

4. sclerosis of the submucosal layer

5. dystrophy and disquamation of the epithelium

6. lymphoid cell infiltration

50. The lumen of the alveoli during respiratory syncytial infection is filled:

1. serous exudate

2. fibrinous exudate

3. giant cells

4. hemorrhagic exudate

5. desquamated alveocytes

51. Determine the type of inflammation if bronchopneumonia is caused by pneumococcus:

1. serous-fibrinous inflammation, microbial edema along the periphery of the foci of inflammation

2. hemorrhagic inflammation with suppuration and necrosis of the walls of the bronchi and alveolar

moves

3. serous-purulent inflammation involving the interstitium

52. Pulmonary complications of lobar pneumonia

1. lung gangrene 4. carnification

2. lung abscess 5. fibrinous pleurisy

3. bronchiectasis 6. pulmonary thromboembolism

53. In croupous pneumonia, the affected lobe

1. fleshy consistency, airless

2. testy consistency, aerial

3. macroscopically unchanged

54. With moderate flu, inflammation develops in

1. trachea 4. conjunctiva

2. pleura 5. upper respiratory tract

3. bronchial tubes

55. In the small bronchi and bronchioles with respiratory syncytial infection observed

1. catarrhal inflammation

2. swelling of the mucosa

3. damage to the epithelium

4. epithelial proliferation with the formation of symplasts

5. leukocyte infiltration

56. Determine the type of inflammation if bronchopneumonia is caused by staphylococcus:

1. serous-fibrinous inflammation, microbial edema along the periphery of the foci of inflammation

2. hemorrhagic inflammation with suppuration and necrosis of the walls of the bronchi and alveolar

moves

3. serous-purulent inflammation involving the interstitium

57. In focal pneumonia, the process begins with

1. interstitial tissue 3. bronchi

2. tissue of the alveoli 4. pleura

58. The first stage of croupous pneumonia

1. red guardianship 3. permissions

2. gray hepatitis 4. tide

59. With moderate flu, inflammation develops in the trachea and bronchi

1. serous hemorrhagic 3. catarrhal

2. fibrinous 4. purulent

60. Perform compliance:

MANIFESTATION VIRUS VIRUS

1. A 1. leads to sporadic cases

2. B 2. greatest epidemiological hazard

3. C 3. causes local outbreaks and epidemics

61. Determine the type of inflammation if bronchopneumonia is caused by streptococcus:

1. serous-fibrinous inflammation, microbial edema along the periphery of the foci of inflammation

2. hemorrhagic inflammation with suppuration and necrosis of the walls of the bronchi and alveolar

moves

3. serous-purulent inflammation involving the interstitium

62. With lobar pneumonia, the process begins with

1. pleura 3. alveolar tissue

2. bronchi 4. interstitial tissue

63. The second stage of croupous pneumonia

1. tide 3. gray ward

2. permissions 4. red guardianship

64. Microscopic changes in the mucous membrane of the larynx and trachea in severe influenza with pulmonary complications are represented by inflammation

1. catarrhal

2. phlegmonous

3. granulomatous

4. with the formation of polyps

5. fibrinous hemorrhagic

65. The causative agent of adenovirus infection enters the body through:

1. intestinal epithelium

2. epithelium of the meninges

3. airway epithelium

4. skin conjunctival epithelium

66. To supplement: acute pneumonitis is ______________________________.

67. Pleural empyema is a common complication.

1. bronchiectasis 3. lung emphysema

2. focal pneumonia 4. pneumosclerosis

68. The third stage of croupous pneumonia

1. tide 3. gray ward

2. permissions 4. red guardianship

69. Variants of severe influenza

1. toxic 3. hepatotoxic

2. myocarditis 4. with pulmonary complications

70. For a mild form of adenovirus infection, the symptoms are:

1. catarrhal conjunctivitis

2. enlarged lymph nodes and spleen

3. purulent necrotic bronchitis

4. interstitial inflammation in the liver and kidneys

5. the presence of giant cells in the epithelium

71. Synonyms for croupous pneumonia include:

1. lobar 4. hypostatic

2. purulent 5. fibrinous

3. pleuropneumonia

72. The staged course of the process is characteristic of pneumonia.

1. focal

2. croupous

3. interstitial

73. In the classic course of croupous pneumonia

1. 4 stages are distinguished 3. 2 stages are distinguished

2. 3 stages are distinguished 4. no staging

74. The toxic variant of severe influenza is characterized by

1. hemorrhage

2. purulent inflammation

3. necrotic nephrosis

4. catarrhal inflammation

5. hemorrhagic pulmonary edema

75. The development of a severe form of adenovirus infection is associated with:

1. intoxication

2. Secondary reproduction of the virus in organs

3. generalization of the virus

4. early age

5. lower immunity

6.a secondary infection

ANSWERS



No. the answers No. the answers
A pathological process characterized by reversible incomplete expansion or collapse of a part or whole lung that previously contained air 39. 1, 2, 4
2, 3, 4 40. 3, 4
1 41. Pneumonia that developed no earlier than 48 hours after hospitalization
5 42. 1a, 2g, 3d
3, 6 43. 3
2, 4, 5 44. 2
fifteen 45. Distal airways
3 46. Focal pneumonia, which is characterized by the development in the pulmonary parenchyma of foci of acute inflammation ranging in size from the acinus to the segment associated with the affected bronchiole
4, 5, 6 47. Pneumococcus
14 48. 2
1, 3, 6 49. 2, 3, 5, 6
2 fifty. 1, 3, 5
3 51. 1
4, 5 52. 1, 2, 4
4 53. 1
fifteen 54. 1, 3, 5
1, 2, 4, 5 55. 3, 4
4 56. 2
1 57. 3
6 58. 4
2 59. 1
1, 3, 4, 5 60. A-2, B-3, C-1
1b, 2a, 3a, 4a, 5a 61. 3
2, 4, 5 62. 3
1, 3, 4, 5, 6 63. 4
3 64. 5
3 65. 1, 3, 4
2 66. Interstitial pneumonia, which is characterized by the primary development of acute inflammation in the alveolar wall and pulmonary interstitium with possible secondary formation of exudate in the lumen of the alveoli.
1a, 2a, 3b, 4a, 5b 67. 2
1, 2, 3 68. 3
4 69. 14
4 - 1 - 2 - 3 70. 1, 2, 5
1 71. 1, 3, 5
2, 3, 4 72. 2
1 73. 1
Damage to the endothelium of capillaries and first-order pneumocytes in the area of ​​the airborne barrier, followed by the development of respiratory failure 74. fifteen
1a, 2b, 3c, 4g 75. 2, 3, 6
3


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