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Classification and pathogenesis of respiratory failure

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Classification and pathogenesis of respiratory failure

  1. The mechanisms of respiratory failure in the pathology of the respiratory tract
    The development of DN in diseases of the respiratory tract is due to an increase in resistive resistance to air flow (RL). In this case, the ventilation of the affected areas of the lung is disturbed, the resistive work of breathing increases, and fatigue and weakness of the respiratory muscles can be the result of irreparable obstruction of the DP. Due to the fact that airway resistance (according to Poiseuille's law)
  2. Respiratory failure
    Despite the fact that respiratory disorders can occur at any stage of gas exchange, the development of respiratory failure as a clinical syndrome is associated exclusively with the pathology of external respiration. The simplest definition was given to her by A.P. Zilber (1996): “Respiratory failure (DN) is a condition of the body in which the ability of the lungs and ventilation apparatus to provide normal gas
  3. Acute respiratory failure
    Acute respiratory failure is a violation of gas exchange between the surrounding air and circulating blood with the presence of hypoxemia and / or hypercapnia, which develops over a period of time from several minutes to several days. ETHIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS, CLASSIFICATION The normal functioning of the respiratory system depends on the work of many of its components (respiratory center, nerves, muscles, chest,
  4. Acute respiratory failure
    There is no universally accepted definition of acute respiratory failure. It seems to us the most capacious, and at the same time not cumbersome definition proposed by V.L. Cassil et al. ONE is a rapidly growing severe condition due to the mismatch between the capabilities of the external respiration apparatus and the metabolic needs of organs and tissues, at which the maximum
  5. Respiratory failure
    Respiratory failure is a gas exchange disorder that requires emergency medical intervention. Definitions of respiratory failure based on arterial blood gas values ​​(Table 50-2) may not be correct for chronic lung diseases: in case of chronic hypercapnia, shortness of breath should be added to the criteria for respiratory failure listed in the table
  6. Pulmonary respiratory failure
    Pulmonary respiratory failure is caused by damage to the airways or a decrease in the respiratory surface of the lungs due to exposure to the lung or damage to the pulmonary parenchyma itself. Respiratory failure due to damage to the airways is called obstructive pulmonary respiratory failure. It should be noted that
  7. Respiratory failure
    Respiratory failure is a pathological condition of the body, in which the normal maintenance of the gas composition of the blood is not ensured or it is achieved due to the tension of the compensatory mechanisms of external respiration. There are five groups of factors that lead to impaired external respiration. 1. Damage to the bronchi and respiratory structures of the lungs: 1) damage to the bronchial tree: increase
  8. Acute respiratory failure
    Clinical characteristics of acute respiratory failure Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a pathological condition in which the body cannot provide the necessary amount of oxygen to organs and tissues. A.P. Zilber (1978) defines ONE even easier: the inability of the lungs to turn venous blood into arterial blood. The most common causes of acute respiratory
  9. ACUTE RESPIRATORY FAILURE
    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a syndrome based on symptoms of impaired external respiration (VFD), which have common anatomical, physiological and biochemical characteristics and lead to insufficient oxygen supply and / or carbon dioxide retention. This condition is characterized by arterial hypoxemia or hypercapnia, or both
  10. ACUTE RESPIRATORY FAILURE
    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a syndrome based on symptoms of impaired external respiration (VFD), which have common anatomical, physiological and biochemical characteristics and lead to insufficient oxygen supply and / or carbon dioxide retention. This condition is characterized by arterial hypoxemia or hypercapnia, or both
  11. Acute respiratory failure
    Clinical characteristics in acute respiratory failure The most important sign of damage to the respiratory system in children is respiratory failure. Respiratory failure is understood as a pathological condition in which external respiration does not provide the normal gas composition of the blood or supports it at the cost of excessive energy costs. Respiratory failure
  12. Acute respiratory failure
    Respiratory failure is a condition in which the respiratory system is not able to provide oxygen and the removal of carbon dioxide, necessary to maintain the normal functioning of the body. Acute respiratory failure is characterized by rapid progression: after a few hours, and sometimes minutes, the patient may die. The main causes of acute
  13. Acute respiratory failure
    Respiratory failure is a pathological condition in which the normal gas composition of the blood is not supported or its provision is achieved by enhancing external respiration. In 20-30% of cases, acute respiratory failure leads to death. Pathophysiology • Respiratory failure occurs due to a violation of the structure of the alveolar-capillary membrane. • Changes in the membrane
  14. RESPIRATORY FAILURE
    In this section, we touch upon issues of relevance to the entire problem of artificial and assisted ventilation in anesthesiology and intensive care. By tradition, this section should begin with a brief description of the basics of the normal physiology of external respiration, however, these issues are adequately reflected in numerous manuals and monographs, and we can hardly
  15. Respiratory failure
    Respiratory (ventilation-pulmonary) insufficiency is characterized by such disorders in which pulmonary gas exchange is impaired or occurs at the cost of excessive energy costs. Types of respiratory failure: 1) ventilation; 2) distribution-diffusion (shuntodiffusion, hypoxemic); 3) mechanical. Clinic. I degree. Dyspnea varies without auxiliary
  16. Acute respiratory failure
    Acute respiratory failure complicates the course of many infectious diseases due to impaired pulmonary ventilation as a result of laryngospasm (tetanus, rabies) and acute inflammation of the larynx (diphtheria, viral croup), respiratory muscle paralysis (botulism, diphtheria), obstructing tracheobronchial and alveolar inflammatory edema (influenza, acute respiratory infections, measles
  17. Pathophysiological variants of respiratory failure
    Respiratory failure can develop if the function of any part of the external respiration apparatus is impaired and, consequently, be a result of damage to the central nervous system (CNS), neuromuscular pathology, chest deformities (pathology of the "pulmonary frame"), respiratory diseases or the parenchyma proper
  18. ACUTE RESPIRATORY FAILURE
    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is the state of the body in which external respiration does not provide a normal level of O2 and CO2 in the arterial blood or its maintenance is achieved by excessive enhancement of breathing, i.e., inadequate use of its reserves. They distinguish between primary ONE when pathological changes occur in any part of the external respiration system (respiratory
  19. Diagnosis and treatment of respiratory failure
    Respiratory failure I degree: shortness of breath at rest is absent; intermittent cyanosis, pallor of the face, anxiety, irritability, normal or moderately elevated blood pressure. Indicators of external respiration: the minute volume of respiration (MOD) is increased, the vital capacity of the lungs (VC) is reduced, the reserve of respiration (RD) is reduced, the volume of respiration (OD) is slightly reduced, the respiratory equivalent (DE) is increased, the coefficient
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