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Classification of human infectious (parasitic) diseases

Many classifications of infectious diseases are proposed, based on various principles, but none of them can be considered perfect.

Modern classification proposed by academician of RAMS V.I. Pokrovsky (2003), which, depending on the natural habitat of pathogens, divides all infections into three groups.

• anthroponosis (from the Greek. Anthropos - man, nosos - disease) - the habitat of pathogens is the human body. These diseases are peculiar only to humans and are transmitted from person to person;

• zoonoses (from the Greek. Zoon - animals) - the habitat is the animal organism. These diseases are characteristic of animals and humans, and are transmitted from animal to human

• sapronoses (from the Greek. - sapros - rotten, nosos - disease) - the habitat is an abiotic (non-living) environment - soil, water, etc.

Each of these groups of infections, depending on the mechanism of transmission of the pathogen and its localization in the host, is divided into four subgroups:

• intestinal infections with fecal-oral transmission mechanism;

• respiratory tract infections with an aerogenic transmission mechanism;

• blood infections with a transmissible transmission mechanism using arthropod vectors;

• infections of the external integument with a contact transmission mechanism.

All infectious diseases according to the etiological principle, i.e.
by kinship of pathogens, they are divided into viral infections, mycoplasmoses, rickettsioses, bacterioses, spirochetoses, mycoses, protozozoses, helminthiases.

In modern problems of food hygiene, the prevention of intestinal infections that spread through food products and for convenience are divided into 3 groups is of great importance:

1 - foodborne infections,

2 - food poisoning,

3 - helminthiases.
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Classification of human infectious (parasitic) diseases

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