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External ear burns

Thermal burns occur when exposed to flame, hot metal, hot liquid, steam, sunlight and modern weapons. Classification of burns adopted at XXYII nuacaa oe? O? Aia, i? Aaoniao? Eaaao 4 noaiaie ii aeoaeia ii? A? Aiey:

I degree - erythema and edema;

II degree - blistering;

IIIa degree - skin necrosis with partial damage to the germ layer;

IIIb degree - necrosis of all skin layers;

IV degree - necrosis of the skin and deeper lying tissues.

Mild burns on the face include burns of I, II and IIIa degrees, in which conservative treatment is carried out and recovery occurs without cosmetic defects. Severe burns are IIIb and IV degree burns. Such ear burns can be complicated by perichondritis, chondritis, cartilage death and deformation of the shells. The burnt surface is considered infected, therefore, treatment measures are carried out taking into account aseptic rules.

Treatment. First aid consists in terminating the action of the traumatic agent and applying an aseptic dressing with the introduction of painkillers, evacuating the victim to the hospital. Local treatment of burns aims to reduce pain, remove non-viable tissue, make the lesion sterile and contribute to the epidermization of the burn surface. Burn wounds should be treated aseptically. The skin around the burned surface is wiped with a cloth moistened with soap and water, and then with a 0.5% solution of ammonia. After removing the dead epidermis, the burn surface is abundantly irrigated with saline, dried and rubbed with alcohol. Bubbles are punctured or cut from below with scissors to evacuate the contents.

Currently, two methods of local treatment of burns are used - indoor and outdoor. The closed method is convenient in the field, as the dressing protects the wound from contamination and facilitates the care of the burned at the stages of evacuation.
An open method of treatment is more often used for face burns. It consists in the fact that after the initial treatment, the dressing is not applied to the burned surface, and the affected areas of the skin are lubricated with astringents (5% tannin solution, pink potassium permanganate solution) or dried under a special skeleton. This method requires aseptic and is applicable in a hospital.

Burns of the auricles of the I and II degrees pass through 10-12 days without a trace and in treatment require only strict adherence to asepsis and the use of painkillers. For burns of IIIb and IV degree, it is advisable to excise dead tissue in the first days with skin autotransplantation, the introduction of tetanus toxoid. Perichondritis from burns of IIIa and IIIb degrees is treated according to the general principles of otolaryngology. With deep burns that cause atresia of the ear canal, excess granulation in it is removed and cauterized with lapis. Until complete epidermization, PVC tubes are inserted into the ear canal against atresia. When indicated, plastic surgery is performed.

In the treatment of burns, plastic is used with a free skin flap. The granulating surface is cleaned of necrotic tissue and sterilized by conventional means. Free skin patches taken from other parts of the body are applied to the prepared surface.

Chemical burns. For chemical burns with acids and alkalis, it is necessary to immediately wash off these substances from the auricle and ear canal with a stream of cold water. After that, the effect of acids is neutralized with alkalis (2% solution of sodium bicarbonate, magnesium oxide, soapy water), and the action of alkalis is neutralized with acids (1-2% solution of acetic or citric acid), which are introduced into the ear canal using turunda. In the future, therapeutic tactics are similar to tactics for thermal burns.
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External ear burns

  1. Anatomy of the outer ear
    The outer ear (Fig. 4.2) includes the auricle (auricula) and the external auditory meatus (meatus acusticus externus). At sh N and I r a k about in and n and it is located between a temporomandibular joint in front and a mastoid behind; it distinguishes between a concave outer surface and a convex inner, facing the mastoid process. The shell backbone is elastic cartilage
  2. Diseases of the outer ear
    Due to the small value of the auricle, all its diseases, as well as damage and developmental abnormalities, up to complete absence, do not entail significant hearing impairment and are mainly of cosmetic value. Another thing is the external auditory canal. Any processes that entail the closure of its lumen, thereby leading to a violation of the air
  3. Foreign bodies of the outer ear
    Clinical picture Foreign bodies of the outer ear are most often observed in children who, playing with various small objects (pebbles, cherry stones, beads, buttons, sunflower seeds, peas, paper balls, etc.), put them into their ears. In adults, foreign bodies can be matches, pieces of cotton wool. There are also living foreign bodies (insects). Symptoms depend on the magnitude.
  4. Tumors of the outer ear
    Benign tumors of the outer ear. Among the epithelial benign tumors, papilloma is often found on the skin of the external auditory canal and auricle. Treatment - excision, diathermocoagulation, cryodestruction and laser destruction. A rare tumor from the sulfur glands of ceruminoma grows slowly, with a pronounced tendency to malignancy. It is observed in people over 25 years old, similar to
  5. EXTERNAL EAR INFLAMMATION
    Inflammation of the outer ear affecting the skin of the auricle and the external auditory canal is a fairly common disease in cats, which most often develops due to tick-borne infestation. Therefore, in the absence of an opportunity to establish an accurate diagnosis, otitis media should be treated in combination with acaricidal (anti-mite) drugs such as the Bars drop, otovedin, or decor-2. It
  6. Outer ear tumor
    Causes Thermal burn, chronic purulent infection, radiation exposure, insolation. Symptoms Ear pain, serous-mucous or purulent discharge, focal or cerebral symptoms, hearing loss up to deafness, growing headache. First aid Self-treatment is not possible. Should refer to
  7. Clinical anatomy of the external ear
    The outer ear includes the auricle (auricula) and the external auditory meatus (meatus acusticus extemus). The auricle is located between the temporomandibular joint in front and the mastoid process in the back. It distinguishes between the external concave and internal convex surface facing the mastoid process. The base of the auricle is a plate of elastic cartilage of complex shape
  8. Abscess of the outer ear. H-60.0
    {foto35} Treatment outcome: Clinical criteria for improving the patient's condition: 1. Normalization of temperature. 2. Normalization of laboratory parameters. 3. Improving the clinical symptoms of the disease (pain, hearing loss, discharge from
  9. Cholesteatoma of the outer ear. H-60.4
    {foto38} Treatment outcome: Clinical criteria for improving the patient's condition: 1. Normalization of temperature. 2. Normalization of laboratory parameters. 3. Improving the clinical symptoms of the disease (pain, hearing loss, discharge from
  10. Perichondritis of the outer ear. H-61.0
    {foto43} Treatment outcome: Clinical criteria for improving the patient's condition: 1. Normalization of temperature. 2. Normalization of laboratory parameters. 3. Improving the clinical symptoms of the disease (pain, hearing loss, discharge from
  11. OUTDOOR DISEASES
    OUTDOOR DISEASES
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