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Tumors of the outer ear

Benign tumors of the outer ear. Among the epithelial benign tumors, papilloma is often found on the skin of the external auditory canal and auricle. Treatment - excision, diathermocoagulation, cryodestruction and laser destruction.

A rare tumor from the sulfur glands of ceruminoma grows slowly, with a pronounced tendency to malignancy. It is observed in people over 25 years old, similar to a polyp in the ear canal, with infiltrating, destructive growth in the tympanum, mastoid, auditory tube, pyramid of the temporal bone, destroying them, which is revealed on radiographs of the temporal bones. After removal, relapses occur in 50% of cases with damage to the bone and cartilage, therefore, radiation therapy is additionally carried out.

Mixed tumors can come from the parotid gland and spread to the outer ear.

Of the rare tumors of the external auditory canal, there are myxomas, fibroids, and lymphomas. Surgical treatment.

Non-epithelial tumors include chondroma, fibroma and osteoma. The former are rare. Osteoma is observed more often in the form of exo- and hyperostoses of the auditory meatus. Exostoses knock endaurally under the base with a flat chisel.

Vascular tumors are found in the form of nevus, hemangiomas and lymphangiomas. Vascular nevi are localized in the auricle and very rarely in the ear canal. Cavernous hemangiomas are often located in the depths of the skin of the ear canal. Hemangiomas are prone to bleeding with minor injuries. Treatment: sclerotherapy, electrocoagulation, cryodestruction, laser destruction, excision and radiation therapy (tumors are radiosensitive).

Tumor-like formations are observed. These include cysts on the anterior surface of the auricle and keloids in the area of ​​postoperative behind-the-ear scars and on the lobe at the puncture site for wearing earrings.

Malignant tumors of the outer ear. Acoustic canal epithelial cancer occurs between the ages of 50-60. First, granulations, a tubercle or an ulcer on the skin are formed (stage I), then cartilage is affected (stage II), and with further development (stage III-IY), the tumor spreads to the face, neck, middle ear, metastases to regional lymph nodes and distant metastases.

More often, squamous (non-keratinizing and keratinizing) cancers are observed, less commonly, basal cell carcinoma, and even less frequently, cylindrome and adenocarcinoma.

Squamous cell carcinoma often occurs in the bony part of the ear canal.
It grows slowly, but can progress. With ulceration of the tumor, bloody, blood-purulent discharge appears. The spread of cancer into the tympanum causes hearing loss, and pain in the cartilage. Metastases to regional lymph nodes are observed.

Basal cell cancer grows mainly in the cartilaginous part of the auditory meatus with ulceration of the skin and damage to the perichondrium. Distribution into the tympanic cavity, parotid gland and facial nerve is possible.

The cylinder grows slowly, recurs, spreads to the temporal bone, mastoid process and metastasizes to the lungs. Adenocarcinoma develops from the glandular epithelium of the sulfur glands, is characterized by rapid growth and frequent metastasis. Local metastases of the auditory canal cancer are observed in the cervical or preauricular lymph nodes, parotid gland.

For early diagnosis of ulcerative lesions, a cytological examination is done, a biopsy. X-ray examination allows to establish the spread of the tumor.

Treatment depends on the stage of the tumor, metastases and its histological structure. In the early stage of a tumor in the cartilaginous part of the ear canal, both radiation therapy and radical removal of the tumor give good results. For large tumors and tumors in the bone part of the ear canal, an extended radical operation is performed with resection of the external auditory canal, eardrum and surgery on the mastoid process with removal of the parotid gland and cervical lymph nodes. Individual otosurgeons perform subtotal resection of the temporal bone. After the operation, radiation therapy is performed. With basal cell carcinoma and cylinders, more radical operations are performed.

Rare melanoma occurs in the auricle, in the external auditory canal and sometimes in the middle ear. She quickly obstructs the ear canal and grows into the tympanic cavity. It gives early and frequent metastases to regional lymph nodes, lungs, liver, bone marrow, etc. Biopsy is contraindicated due to the rapid hematogenous dissemination of the tumor. Combined treatment with possibly radical removal of the tumor.
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Tumors of the outer ear

  1. Outer ear tumor
    Causes Thermal burn, chronic purulent infection, radiation exposure, insolation. Symptoms Ear pain, serous-mucous or purulent discharge, focal or cerebral symptoms, hearing loss up to deafness, growing headache. First aid Self-treatment is not possible. Should refer to
  2. Anatomy of the outer ear
    The outer ear (Fig. 4.2) includes the auricle (auricula) and the external auditory meatus (meatus acusticus externus). At sh N and I r a k about in and n and it is located between a temporomandibular joint in front and a mastoid behind; it distinguishes between a concave outer surface and a convex inner, facing the mastoid process. The shell backbone is elastic cartilage
  3. Diseases of the outer ear
    Due to the small value of the auricle, all its diseases, as well as damage and developmental abnormalities, up to complete absence, do not entail significant hearing impairment and are mainly of cosmetic value. Another thing is the external auditory canal. Any processes that entail the closure of its lumen, thereby leading to a violation of the air
  4. Foreign bodies of the outer ear
    Clinical picture Foreign bodies of the outer ear are most often observed in children who, playing with various small objects (pebbles, cherry stones, beads, buttons, sunflower seeds, peas, paper balls, etc.), put them into their ears. In adults, foreign bodies can be matches, pieces of cotton wool. There are also living foreign bodies (insects). Symptoms depend on the magnitude.
  5. EXTERNAL EAR INFLAMMATION
    Inflammation of the outer ear affecting the skin of the auricle and the external auditory canal is a fairly common disease in cats, which most often develops due to tick-borne infestation. Therefore, in the absence of an opportunity to establish an accurate diagnosis, otitis media should be treated in combination with acaricidal (anti-mite) drugs such as the Bars drop, otovedin or decor-2. It
  6. Clinical anatomy of the external ear
    The outer ear includes the auricle (auricula) and the external auditory meatus (meatus acusticus extemus). The auricle is located between the temporomandibular joint in front and the mastoid process in the back. It distinguishes between the external concave and internal convex surface facing the mastoid process. The base of the auricle is a plate of elastic cartilage of complex shape
  7. Benign ear tumors
    Ear tumors are rare diseases. There are benign and malignant neoplasms. Benign ear tumors include papillomas, fibromas, angiomas, chondromas, osteomas, etc. Of the tumor-like formations, various cysts (atheromas, dermoids, etc.) should be noted. Benign tumors are localized mainly in the outer ear.
  8. Malignant tumors of the ear
    Malignant tumors of the ear can be both primary, i.e. developed directly in a particular department of the ear, and arising from the germination of tumors from neighboring organs and tissues. In the outer and middle ear, cancer is more often diagnosed in adults, and sarcoma in children. Of the other species, there may be melanoma. The course of tumors of the outer ear is relatively slow, they look like
  9. Abscess of the outer ear. H-60.0
    {foto35} Treatment outcome: Clinical criteria for improving the patient's condition: 1. Normalization of temperature. 2. Normalization of laboratory parameters. 3. Improving the clinical symptoms of the disease (pain, hearing loss, discharge from
  10. Cholesteatoma of the outer ear. H-60.4
    {foto38} Treatment outcome: Clinical criteria for improving the patient's condition: 1. Normalization of temperature. 2. Normalization of laboratory parameters. 3. Improving the clinical symptoms of the disease (pain, hearing loss, discharge from
  11. Perichondritis of the outer ear. H-61.0
    {foto43} Treatment outcome: Clinical criteria for improving the patient's condition: 1. Normalization of temperature. 2. Normalization of laboratory parameters. 3. Improving the clinical symptoms of the disease (pain, hearing loss, discharge from
  12. OUTDOOR DISEASES
    OUTDOOR DISEASES
  13. External ear burns
    Thermal burns occur when exposed to flame, hot metal, hot liquid, steam, sunlight and modern weapons. The classification of burns adopted at XXYII nuacaa oe? O? Aia, i? Aaoniao? Eaaao 4 noaiaie ii aeoaeia ii? A? Aiey: I degree - erythema and edema; II degree - blistering; IIIa degree - skin necrosis with partial damage to the germ layer;
  14. Diseases of the outer ear
    Outdoor diseases
  15. Other diseases of the outer ear. H-61.
    {foto42} Treatment outcome: Clinical criteria for improving the patient's condition: 1. Normalization of temperature. 2. Normalization of laboratory parameters. 3. Improving the clinical symptoms of the disease (pain, hearing loss, discharge from
  16. Unspecified external ear disease. H-61.9
    {foto48} Treatment outcome: Clinical criteria for improving the patient's condition: 1. Normalization of temperature. 2. Normalization of laboratory parameters. 3. Improving the clinical symptoms of the disease (pain, hearing loss, discharge from
  17. Perichondritis and erysipelas of the outer ear, differential diagnosis, treatment
    Perichondritis is a diffuse inflammation of the perichondrium involving the skin of the outer ear. Etiology: perichondritis occurs as a result of infection (pseudomonas aeruginosa), mechanical injury, thermal (burns, frostbite), ear boils, sometimes flu, tuberculosis. Purulent perichondritis is more often observed, less often serous. Clinic: Puffiness, gradually spreading throughout
  18. Other specified diseases of the outer ear. H-61.8
    {foto47} Treatment outcome: Clinical criteria for improving the patient's condition: 1. Normalization of temperature. 2. Normalization of laboratory parameters. 3. Improving the clinical symptoms of the disease (pain, hearing loss, discharge from
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